30. Juni 2007

NGO-Aufruf an die Staatsführer der SADC

amnesty international und die beiden Menschenrechtsorganisationen Zimbabwe Human Rights NGO Forum und Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights haben gemeinsam ein Statement veröffentlicht. Darin werden die Staatsführer der Entwicklungsgemeinschaft im südlichen Afrika (SADC) aufgerufen, von der Regierung Simbabwes ein Ende der Menschenrechtsverletzungen in Simbabwe zu fordern. Der Appell richtet sich insbesondere auf den von den SADC-Staaten als Mediator eingesetzten südafrikanischen Präsident Thabo Mbeki. Er soll sicherstellen, dass Menschenrechtsthemen in Übereinkommen zwischen der Regierung Simbabwes und der Oppositionspartei Simbabwes vorrangig beachtet werden.
Besonders bemerkenswert bei diesem Aufruf sind die zahlreichen NGOs aus Zimbabwe, die trotz hohen Risikos unterschrieben haben. Die österreichische Unterstützerin dieser Erklärung ist SADOCC.

Im Folgenden das Statement im Wortlaut sowie die unterstützenden Organisationen:

Human rights issues must be at the centre of any dialogue between the government of Zimbabwe and the Movement for Democratic Change

A joint statement from Amnesty International, Zimbabwe Human Rights NGO Forum and Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights

Three months after the extra-ordinary Summit of the Heads of State and Government of the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC), which took place on 29 March 2007 in Dar es Salaam, the United Republic of Tanzania, over one hundred international human rights and civil society organisations have come together to call on SADC leaders to urge the government of Zimbabwe to end human rights violations in Zimbabwe. In particular, we call on President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa, in his capacity as the SADC-appointed mediator, to ensure that human rights issues are prioritised in any settlement to be agreed by the government of Zimbabwe and the political opposition party, the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC).
Attacks on members of the political opposition and civil society organisations are taking place in the context of a severely declining economy as well as an increasingly repressive environment in Zimbabwe, in which the rights to freedom of expression, association and assembly are regularly suppressed by the government and incidents of state-sponsored organised violence and torture are increasing.
President Mbeki was mandated to facilitate a dialogue between the government of Zimbabwe and the MDC, following the torture and ill-treatment of a number of leaders and members of the MDC and other civil society organisations by the Zimbabwe Republic Police on 11 March 2007. The MDC and human rights activists were arrested for attempting to attend a prayer meeting organised to protest a three month ban of rallies and demonstrations imposed by police in parts of Harare under section 27 of the Public Order and Security Act.
We are concerned that since the SADC meeting, arbitrary arrest and detention, torture and organised violence have been on the increase in Zimbabwe.
At least 30 political detainees arrested on 28 March 2007, including MDC Member of Parliament Paul Madzore and MDC Director of Elections Dennis Murira, spent over two months in custody awaiting trial, and 18 have since had the charges dropped.
The detainees' lawyers, Alec Muchadehama and Andrew Makoni, were also arrested outside the High Court on 4 May 2007 after submitting court papers on behalf of Amos Musekiwa, one of the political detainees. The lawyers were only released on bail on 7 May.
On 8 May police in Harare beat lawyers who had gathered outside the High Court to protest the unlawful arrest of Alec Muchadehama and Andrew Makoni. Police forced some of the lawyers including Beatrice Mtetwa, President of the Zimbabwe Law Society, into a police truck before driving to a secluded area and reportedly beating them. They were then released.
The Zimbabwean government has justified arbitrary arrest, detention, torture and ill-treatment as a response to attacks on police by alleged opposition supporters. As with all alleged criminal acts, we urge the government of Zimbabwe to immediately and impartially investigate these attacks, respecting the rights of the suspected perpetrators, including the right to a fair trial. However, incidents of violence by protestors by no means justify excessive use of force, torture or ill-treatment by the police.
We are also concerned that two years after an estimated 700,000 people lost their home or livelihood or both when the government embarked on a programme of mass forced evictions codenamed Operation Murambatsvina (Restore Order), the government has failed to provide an effective remedy to the victims. Most of the victims are still in urgent need of humanitarian assistance. The SADC initiative should not forget these victims of human rights violations.
These human rights concerns have been well documented, including in the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights' report of its 2002 fact-finding mission to Zimbabwe. However, the government of Zimbabwe has failed to implement key recommendations contained in the African Commission's report and its resolution adopted at the 38th Ordinary Session in November 2005.
The human rights situation in Zimbabwe requires immediate action by SADC leaders. President Mbeki and other leaders of SADC should send a clear and unequivocal signal to the government of Zimbabwe that they will not remain silent about the violations of human rights perpetrated in Zimbabwe and should ensure that the government of Zimbabwe takes immediate steps to respect and protect human rights of all people in Zimbabwe, including ending the use of excessive force, torture and ill-treatment. Central to resolving the crisis in Zimbabwe is the need to ensure that perpetrators of human rights violations are held accountable and that the victims have access to justice. Any attempt to circumvent the needs of victims will not bring a lasting solution.
In their mediation efforts, President Mbeki and the other member states of SADC should not be limited to finding a short-term political solution between the government of Zimbabwe and the MDC, but should aim to find a long-term solution to the human rights crisis in Zimbabwe. This can be achieved by consulting widely among civil society organisations in Zimbabwe and ensuring that all stakeholders are able to contribute to the process.

Through their mediation efforts, we urge President Mbeki and the other member states of SADC to ensure the following:

  • all parties involved in the mediation process agree to clear timelines and bench marks, including the respect and protection of human rights for all, an end to organised violence, and fulfilment of Zimbabwe 's obligations under the African Union and UN human rights frameworks.

  • the government of Zimbabwe immediately ends its campaign of intimidation and harassment of human rights activists, civil society leaders, members of the political opposition parties and other critics of government policies;

  • the government of Zimbabwe fully respects the right to freedom of association, peaceful assembly and expression and repeal or amend its national laws to bring them into line with regional and international human rights standards, including the African Charter on Human and Peoples ' Rights and the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights to which Zimbabwe is a state party;

  • the government of Zimbabwe takes immediate steps to end torture, other ill-treatment and serious human rights violations by the police and other security forces. Relevant authorities in Zimbabwe should investigate and hold the perpetrators of violations of human rights accountable; and

  • all those who are currently homeless as a result of the mass forced evictions have access to humanitarian assistance, including emergency shelter, food, water and medical care. The victims of forced evictions should be given an effective remedy.

Supporting organisations:

The Southern Africa Documentation and Co-operation Centre (SADOCC)

Austria

DITSHWANELO - The Botswana Centre for Human Rights

Botswana

The Botswana Council of Churches (BCC)

Botswana

The Botswana Council of Non-Governmental Organisations (BOCONGO)

Botswana

The Botswana Secondary Teachers Union (BOSETU)

Botswana

DITSHWANELO - The Botswana Centre for Human Rights

Botswana

The Media Institute of Southern Africa (MISA) Botswana Chapter

Botswana

The Botswana Congress Party (BCP)

Botswana

The Botswana Community Based Organisations Network)(BOCOBONET)

Botswana

Botswana Network on Ethics, Law and HIV/AIDS,(BONELA)

Botswana

The Botswana Unified Local Government Service Association(BULGASA)

Botswana

Cooperation for Research, Development and Education (CORDE)

Botswana

Kagisano Society Women's Shelter

Botswana

Kgolagano Theological College

Botswana

Transparency International Botswana

Botswana

Mouvement Ivoirien des Droits Humains (M.I.D.H.)

Côte-d'Ivoire

Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights

Egypt

Collectif des Associations Contre l 'Impunité au Togo (CACIT)

France

Kunst für Menschenrechte (Art for Human Rights)

Germany

The Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative

India

CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation

International

Coalition on Violence Against Women (COVAW-K)

Kenya

Kenya Land Alliance

Kenya

Citizens for Constitutional Change-4Cs

Kenya

Fida Kenya

Kenya

Chemichemi ya Ukweli

Kenya

Independent Medical Legal Unit-UMLU

Kenya

Habiba International Women and Youth affairs.

Kenya

Constitutional Reform Education Consortium (CRECO)

Kenya

Center for Democratic Empowerment (CEDE)

Liberia

Institute for Policy Interaction

Malawi

Associação Moçambicana para o Desenvolvimento e Democracia

Mozambique

The Rainbow Project

Namibia

The Legal Assistance Centre

Namibia

Namibia Development Trust

Namibia

Namibia NGO Forum

Namibia

Nyae Nyae Development Foundation of Namibia

Namibia

!Nara Training Centre

Namibia

Zimbabwe Watch

Netherlands

National Forum for Human Rights

Sierra Leone

National Advocacy Coalition on Extractives

Sierra Leone

Defence for Children International

Sierra Leone

Action for Community Task

Sierra Leone

Movement of Concerned Kono Youths

Sierra Leone

Affected Mining Landowners Association - Kono

Sierra Leone

Community Advocacy and Development Movement

Sierra Leone

Rural Development and Productive Workers Union

Sierra Leone

Mining and Allied Union

Sierra Leone

Peace and Conflict Society FBC

Sierra Leone

Centre for Human Rights - Tongolici

Sierra Leone

Black Hall Road Youth Organisation

Sierra Leone

Network Movement for Youth and Children

Sierra Leone

Network for Community Development and Human Rights

Sierra Leone

Society for Democratic Initiatives - Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

Civil Society Alternative Process of Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

Treatment Action Campaign

South Africa

Southern Africa Litigation Centre(SALC)

South Africa

Lawyers for Human Rights- South Africa

South Africa

Media Institute of Southern Africa - South Africa

South Africa

Solidarity Peace Trust

South Africa

Zimbabwe Exiles Forum

South Africa

South African NGO Coalition (SANGOCO)
Land Access Movement of South Africa

South Africa
South Africa

Sudan Organisation Against Torture (SOAT)

Sudan

African Centre for Democracy and Human Rights Studies

The Gambia

West Africa Network for Peacebuilding (Togo)

Togo

La Commission Episcopale Nationale JUSTICE ET PAIX

Togo

Association togolaise pour la défense et la promotion des droits de l'homme (ATDPDH)

Togo

Fahamu - Networks for Social Justice.

UK

Redress

UK

Review of African Political Economy

UK

International Bar Association 's Human Rights Institute

UK

Human Rights Watch

United States

Legal Resources Foundation-Zambia

Zambia

Southern Africa Legal Assistance Network-SALAN

Zambia

Media Institute of Southern Africa - Zambia

Zambia

Catholic Commission for Justice, Development and Peace (CCJDP)

Zambia

Civil Sodiety MDG Campaign Zambia

Zambia

Zimbabwe Association of Doctors for Human Rights

Zimbabwe

Women of Zimbabwe Arise (WOZA) and Men of Zimbabwe Arise (MOZA)

Zimbabwe

Justice for Agriculture Trust (JAG)

Zimbabwe

Justice for Agriculture Membership Association (JAGMA)

Zimbabwe

Media Monitoring Project of Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

Transparency International Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

Bulawayo Agenda

Zimbabwe

Catholic Commission for Justice and Peace

Zimbabwe

Crisis in Zimbabwe Coalition

Zimbabwe

Gays and Lesbians of Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

Legal Resources Foundation

Zimbabwe

Media Institute of Southern Africa

Zimbabwe

National Association of Non-Governmental Organisations

Zimbabwe

National Constitutional Assembly

Zimbabwe

Non-violent Action and Strategies for Social Change

Zimbabwe

Radio Dialogue

Zimbabwe

Southern Africa Human Rights Trust

Zimbabwe

Transparency International (Zimbabwe)

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe Association for Crime Prevention and the Rehabilitation of the Offender

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe Civic Education Trust

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe Human Rights Association

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe Peace Project

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe Women Lawyers Association

Zimbabwe

Combined Harare Residents Association (CHRA)

Zimbabwe

Nonviolent Action and Strategies for Social Change (NOVASC)

Zimbabwe


(SADOCC)

Seitenanfang

URL: http://www.sadocc.at/news/2007/2007-088.shtml
Copyright © 2017 SADOCC - Southern Africa Documentation and Cooperation Centre.
Rechtliche Hinweise / Legal notice